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Nisar: Celebration in America before sending NASA-ISRO's shared satellite to India, scientists congratulated

Pankaj Prasad
NASA ISRO collaboration
NASA ISRO collaboration

The construction of the joint satellite NISAR being built by NASA-ISRO has reached its final stage.

The construction of the joint satellite NISAR being built by NASA-ISRO has reached its final stage. That is to say, only a few more days are left for it to leave for India. Scientists are gearing up to successfully send this satellite to India. Not only this, the scientists also organized a farewell ceremony for this in California on Friday and were seen wishing each other. The ceremony was attended by ISRO Chairman S Somnath, JPL Director Laurie Leshin, several eminent scientists from NASA Headquarters.

One step closer to fulfilling the huge scientific potential: ISRO Chairman

ISRO Chairman S Somnath said that we joined this mission more than eight years ago. But now we are one step closer to fulfilling the enormous scientific potential envisioned for NISAR. This mission will be a powerful demonstration of radar's potential as a science tool and will help us study Earth's dynamic land and ice surfaces in greater detail than ever before. The NISAR mission will measure Earth's changing ecosystems, dynamic levels and ice mass to obtain information on biomass, natural hazards, sea level rise and groundwater, and provide technical support.

"This is an important milestone in our shared journey to better understand planet Earth and our changing climate," said Laurie Leshin, director of JPL. By providing measurements at unprecedented accuracy, NISAR promises a new understanding and positive impact in communities. Our collaboration with ISRO is an example of how together we tackle complex challenges.

NISAR will collect radar data with reflector antenna

Explain that NISAR will collect radar data with a drum-shaped reflector antenna about 40 feet (12 meters) in diameter. It will use a signal-processing technique called Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, or InSAR, to observe changes in Earth's land and ice surfaces down to a fraction of an inch.