Delhi High Court Rebukes Delhi Government and MCD Over Textbook Issue

S Choudhury
Delhi High Court Rebukes Delhi Government and MCD Over Textbook Issue
Delhi High Court Rebukes Delhi Government and MCD Over Textbook Issue

The Delhi High Court’s sharp criticism of the Delhi Government and MCD for failing to provide textbooks to students underscores systemic challenges.

The Delhi High Court has issued a stern rebuke to the Delhi Government and the Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD) for their failure to provide textbooks to over 2 lakh students. In a scathing remark, the court criticized the Delhi government's focus on retaining power, emphasizing that Arvind Kejriwal's decision to remain in office despite arrest prioritizes personal interests over national concerns. The court, which heard the case on Friday, has reserved its decision and is set to deliver its verdict on Monday.

Acting Chief Justice Manmohan expressed dissatisfaction with the Delhi government's stance, highlighting the dire situation in the capital where essential MCD functions have come to a halt. The court admonished the parties involved, cautioning against underestimating the court's authority. The rebuke came during a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) hearing, which alleged that the ongoing feud between the Municipal Corporation has deprived students in MCD schools of textbooks, forcing them to study in makeshift tin sheds.

The High Court also directed sharp criticism at Urban Development Minister Saurabh Bhardwaj, accusing him of turning a blind eye to the issue and shedding crocodile tears. The court's comments were prompted by the Delhi government's assertion, conveyed by lawyer Shadan Farasat, that Bhardwaj had instructed that the Chief Minister's consent would be required to delegate powers to an appropriate authority in the absence of the MCD Standing Committee, currently in custody.

Acting Chief Justice Manmohan emphasized that including Saurabh Bhardwaj's name in the court's order would be warranted. In response, Advocate Farasat cited the LG's alleged unlawful appointment of aldermen and ongoing Supreme Court deliberations. The High Court reiterated that while it is not its responsibility to distribute books and uniforms, it intervenes when authorities fail in their duties. The court questioned the government's priorities, emphasizing the pursuit of power over addressing critical issues affecting citizens.